A History of Twentieth Century American Academic Cartography

Robert McMaster, Susanna McMaster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The academic discipline of cartography is a twentieth-century phenomenon. From its incipient roots in landscape representation in geology and the mapping of socio-economic data in geography, it grew into its own sub-discipline with graduate programs, research paradigms, and a scientific literature of its own. It came close to establishing a national center for cartography in the late 1960s. After rather sporadic activity before World War II, the period from 1946 to 1986 saw the building of major graduate programs at the universities of Wisconsin, Kansas, and Washington. Other programs were created, often with the doctoral students from those three. At the end of the twentieth century, cartography underwent significant changes in relation to the emerging discipline of geographic information science. The future for academic cartography is less certain, as graduate programs adjust the balances among the many components of mapping science, including cartography, geovisualization, GI science, GIS systems, spatial analysis/statistics, and remote sensing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)305-321
Number of pages17
JournalCartography and Geographic Information Science
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2002

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cartography
twentieth century
History
history
graduate
technical literature
science
spatial analysis
information science
World War II
research program
Geographical Information System
Information science
student
GIS
Geology
statistics
geology
20th century
paradigm

Keywords

  • Analytical cartography
  • Arthur Robinson
  • Erwin Raisz
  • George Jenks
  • John Paul Goode
  • John Sherman
  • Richard Edes Harrison
  • Waldo Tobler

Cite this

A History of Twentieth Century American Academic Cartography. / McMaster, Robert; McMaster, Susanna.

In: Cartography and Geographic Information Science, Vol. 29, No. 3, 07.2002, p. 305-321.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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