A high omega 3 fatty acid diet alters fatty acid composition of heart, liver, kidney, adipose tissue and skeletal muscle in swine

Winfried Otten, Christoph Wirth, Paul A. Iaizzo, Hans M. Eichinger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

54 Scopus citations

Abstract

The fatty acid profiles and total lipid contents of two skeletal muscles, adipose tissue, heart, liver and kidney of swine fed a diet rich in omega 3 (n-3) fatty acids (i.e., 5% fish oil) was investigated. These values were compared to those determined for animals which were fed an equal caloric diet low in n-3 fatty acids (i.e., 5% coconut oil). All supplementations were given over a 13-week period. The lipids were extracted with chloroform-methanol, transcsterified and the relative fatty acid methylesters concentrations were determined using capillary gas chromatography. The fish oil diet significantly enhanced the relative amounts of n-3 fatty acids (i.e., eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid) in all tissues examined. In the heart, liver and kidney, the increases in n-3 fatty acids were compensated by decreases primarily in arachi- donic acid, but in the other tissues the contents of lauric and myristic acids were also reduced. In general, the n-3 fatty acid contents were 40-165% higher in the animals fed the fish oil. Supplementation of n-3 fatty acids in swine induced a significant incorporation of these fatty acids throughout the body, however the extent of this incorporation differed between tissues perhaps due to tissue-specific metabolic pathways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)134-141
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

Keywords

  • Capillary gas chromatography
  • Diet supplementation
  • Docosahexaenoic acid
  • Eicosapentaenoic acid
  • Total lipid content

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