A Head Start or a Step Behind? Understanding How Dispositional and Motivational Resources Influence Emotional Exhaustion

John D. Kammeyer-Mueller, Lauren S. Simon, Timothy A. Judge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

This 10-day diary study examined emotional exhaustion throughout the workday using conservation of resources and self-determination theories in the context of service work (nursing). Results revealed that the impact of prework emotional exhaustion on postwork emotional exhaustion was moderated by both personality and motivation. Neurotic individuals had high levels of postwork exhaustion regardless of their level of prework exhaustion. Extrinsically motivated individuals were especially likely to be exhausted after work if they were also exhausted before work. Finally, although intrinsically motivated individuals were less likely to be exhausted in general, the salutary effects of intrinsic motivation were reduced when prework exhaustion was high. These findings are consistent with the idea that neuroticism reflects a state of chronically worrying about resource loss, extrinsic motivation is a drain on personal resources, and intrinsic motivation is a resource that is less accessible as prework exhaustion levels increase.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)561-581
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Management
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Keywords

  • motivation
  • stress
  • well-being

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