A handheld noninvasive sensing method for the measurement of compartment pressures

C. Flegel, K. Singal, Rajesh Rajamani

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Compartment syndrome is a major concern in cases of extremity trauma, which occur in over 70% of military combat casualty. Without treatment, compartment syndrome can lead to paralysis, loss of limb, or death. This paper focuses on the development of a handheld sensor that can be used for the non-invasive diagnosis of compartment syndrome. Analytical development of the sensing principle is first presented in which a relation is obtained between the pressure in a fluid compartment and the stiffness experienced by a handheld probe pushing on the compartment. Then a handheld sensor that can measure stiffness of an object without requiring the use of any inertial reference is presented. The handheld sensor consists of an array of three miniature force-sensing spring loaded pistons placed together on a probe. The center spring is chosen to be significantly stiffer than the side springs. The ratio of forces between the stiff and soft springs is proportional to the stiffness of the soft object against which the probe is pushed. Small mm-sized magnets on the pistons and magnetic field measurement chips are used to measure the forces in the individual pistons. Experimental results are presented using an in-vitro test rig that replicates a fluid pressure compartment. The sensor is shown to measure pressure accurately with a resolution of 0.1 psi over the range 0.75 psi to 2.5 psi.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationControl, Monitoring, and Energy Harvesting of Vibratory Systems; Cooperative and Networked Control; Delay Systems; Dynamical Modeling and Diagnostics in Biomedical Systems;
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
ISBN (Print)9780791856130
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013
EventASME 2013 Dynamic Systems and Control Conference, DSCC 2013 - Palo Alto, CA, United States
Duration: Oct 21 2013Oct 23 2013

Publication series

NameASME 2013 Dynamic Systems and Control Conference, DSCC 2013
Volume2

Other

OtherASME 2013 Dynamic Systems and Control Conference, DSCC 2013
CountryUnited States
CityPalo Alto, CA
Period10/21/1310/23/13

Fingerprint

Pistons
Sensors
Stiffness
Magnetic field measurement
Fluids
Magnets

Cite this

Flegel, C., Singal, K., & Rajamani, R. (2013). A handheld noninvasive sensing method for the measurement of compartment pressures. In Control, Monitoring, and Energy Harvesting of Vibratory Systems; Cooperative and Networked Control; Delay Systems; Dynamical Modeling and Diagnostics in Biomedical Systems; [DSCC2013-3847] (ASME 2013 Dynamic Systems and Control Conference, DSCC 2013; Vol. 2). American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). https://doi.org/10.1115/DSCC2013-3847

A handheld noninvasive sensing method for the measurement of compartment pressures. / Flegel, C.; Singal, K.; Rajamani, Rajesh.

Control, Monitoring, and Energy Harvesting of Vibratory Systems; Cooperative and Networked Control; Delay Systems; Dynamical Modeling and Diagnostics in Biomedical Systems;. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2013. DSCC2013-3847 (ASME 2013 Dynamic Systems and Control Conference, DSCC 2013; Vol. 2).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Flegel, C, Singal, K & Rajamani, R 2013, A handheld noninvasive sensing method for the measurement of compartment pressures. in Control, Monitoring, and Energy Harvesting of Vibratory Systems; Cooperative and Networked Control; Delay Systems; Dynamical Modeling and Diagnostics in Biomedical Systems;., DSCC2013-3847, ASME 2013 Dynamic Systems and Control Conference, DSCC 2013, vol. 2, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), ASME 2013 Dynamic Systems and Control Conference, DSCC 2013, Palo Alto, CA, United States, 10/21/13. https://doi.org/10.1115/DSCC2013-3847
Flegel C, Singal K, Rajamani R. A handheld noninvasive sensing method for the measurement of compartment pressures. In Control, Monitoring, and Energy Harvesting of Vibratory Systems; Cooperative and Networked Control; Delay Systems; Dynamical Modeling and Diagnostics in Biomedical Systems;. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). 2013. DSCC2013-3847. (ASME 2013 Dynamic Systems and Control Conference, DSCC 2013). https://doi.org/10.1115/DSCC2013-3847
Flegel, C. ; Singal, K. ; Rajamani, Rajesh. / A handheld noninvasive sensing method for the measurement of compartment pressures. Control, Monitoring, and Energy Harvesting of Vibratory Systems; Cooperative and Networked Control; Delay Systems; Dynamical Modeling and Diagnostics in Biomedical Systems;. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2013. (ASME 2013 Dynamic Systems and Control Conference, DSCC 2013).
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