A framework for predicting impacts on ecosystem services from (sub)organismal responses to chemicals

Valery E Forbes, Chris J. Salice, Bjorn Birnir, Randy J.F. Bruins, Peter Calow, Virginie Ducrot, Nika Galic, Kristina Garber, Bret C. Harvey, Henriette Jager, Andrew Kanarek, Robert Pastorok, Steve F. Railsback, Richard Rebarber, Pernille Thorbek

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Protection of ecosystem services is increasingly emphasized as a risk-assessment goal, but there are wide gaps between current ecological risk-assessment endpoints and potential effects on services provided by ecosystems. The authors present a framework that links common ecotoxicological endpoints to chemical impacts on populations and communities and the ecosystem services that they provide. This framework builds on considerable advances in mechanistic effects models designed to span multiple levels of biological organization and account for various types of biological interactions and feedbacks. For illustration, the authors introduce 2 case studies that employ well-developed and validated mechanistic effects models: the inSTREAM individual-based model for fish populations and the AQUATOX ecosystem model. They also show how dynamic energy budget theory can provide a common currency for interpreting organism-level toxicity. They suggest that a framework based on mechanistic models that predict impacts on ecosystem services resulting from chemical exposure, combined with economic valuation, can provide a useful approach for informing environmental management. The authors highlight the potential benefits of using this framework as well as the challenges that will need to be addressed in future work. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:845–859.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)845-859
Number of pages15
JournalEnvironmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Fingerprint

ecosystem service
Ecosystems
Ecosystem
risk assessment
Risk assessment
individual-based model
ecosystem
currency
energy budget
valuation
Environmental management
environmental management
Social Welfare
Budgets
Fish
Population
Toxicity
toxicity
Fishes
Economics

Keywords

  • Ecological production function
  • Ecological risk assessment
  • Ecosystem service
  • Environmental management
  • Mechanistic effects model

Cite this

A framework for predicting impacts on ecosystem services from (sub)organismal responses to chemicals. / Forbes, Valery E; Salice, Chris J.; Birnir, Bjorn; Bruins, Randy J.F.; Calow, Peter; Ducrot, Virginie; Galic, Nika; Garber, Kristina; Harvey, Bret C.; Jager, Henriette; Kanarek, Andrew; Pastorok, Robert; Railsback, Steve F.; Rebarber, Richard; Thorbek, Pernille.

In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, Vol. 36, No. 4, 01.04.2017, p. 845-859.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Forbes, VE, Salice, CJ, Birnir, B, Bruins, RJF, Calow, P, Ducrot, V, Galic, N, Garber, K, Harvey, BC, Jager, H, Kanarek, A, Pastorok, R, Railsback, SF, Rebarber, R & Thorbek, P 2017, 'A framework for predicting impacts on ecosystem services from (sub)organismal responses to chemicals', Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, vol. 36, no. 4, pp. 845-859. https://doi.org/10.1002/etc.3720
Forbes, Valery E ; Salice, Chris J. ; Birnir, Bjorn ; Bruins, Randy J.F. ; Calow, Peter ; Ducrot, Virginie ; Galic, Nika ; Garber, Kristina ; Harvey, Bret C. ; Jager, Henriette ; Kanarek, Andrew ; Pastorok, Robert ; Railsback, Steve F. ; Rebarber, Richard ; Thorbek, Pernille. / A framework for predicting impacts on ecosystem services from (sub)organismal responses to chemicals. In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. 2017 ; Vol. 36, No. 4. pp. 845-859.
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