A crossed-disciplinary evaluation of parental perceptions surrounding pediatric non-invasive brain stimulation research

Michael Behan, Tanjila Nawshin, Samuel Nemanich, Jesse Kowalski, Ellen Sutter, Sunday Francis, Janet Dubinsky, Rebecca Freese, Kyle Rudser, Bernadette Gillick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Recruitment for pediatric non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) studies is often challenged by low enrollment. Understanding parental perceptions regarding NIBS is crucial to develop new communication strategies to increase enrollment. Design/methodology/approach: Integrating a crossed-disciplinary approach, the authors conducted a survey at the 2018 Minnesota State Fair querying the perception of risk and preferences of current and future parents associated with pediatric NIBS research. The survey consisted of 28 closed-text questions including demographics, photographs portraying NIBS, terminologies and factors related to NIBS studies. Findings: Complete surveys were analyzed from 622 parent participants. A significant number of participants (42.8%) perceived the photographs of NIBS as “risky.” Additionally, 65.43% perceived the term “Non-invasive brain therapy” as not risky, a word combination not currently being used when recruiting potential participants. Over 90% (561/622) of participants chose the photograph of child-friendly MRI suite. Research limitations/implications: Although this survey identified aspects crucial in recruitment for pediatric NIBS research, there were limitations. For example, the authors did not record the sex or demographic distribution (e.g. rural versus urban setting) of the participants. These factors may also influence recruitment messaging. Originality/value: For important medical research to impact and improve the lives of the potential remedies, participation by the public in clinical trials is necessary. Often the general public perceives the trials as risky as a result of poor marketing communication recruitment material. This study sought to be understood if how the message is encoded has an impact on the decoding by the receiver.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)623-640
Number of pages18
JournalInternational Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 31 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by the National Institutes of Health’s National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, grant UL1TR002494 ( www.ctsi.umn.edu/about/what-we-do/about-ctsa-award ). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health’s National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences.

Funding Information:
The research opportunity was provided by the D2D Research Facility at the University of Minnesota. It was funded by a grant from the Department of Marketing at the Winona State University and National Institutes of Health (NIH) Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institutes of Child Health and Development K01 Award (HD078484-01A1).

Keywords

  • Clinical trial recruitment
  • Enrollment
  • Marketing communication
  • Non-invasive brain stimulation
  • Parent
  • Pediatric
  • Perception

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