A cross sectional survey of factors influencing mortality in Rwandan surgical patients in the intensive care unit

Gisele Juru Bunogerane, Jennifer L Rickard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Management of critically ill patients is a challenge in low resource settings where there is a paucity of trained staff, infrastructure, resources, and drugs. We aimed to study the characteristics of surgical patients admitted in intensive care unit in a limited resource setting and determine factors associated with mortality. Methods: This was a cross-sectional observational study of all surgical patients admitted to the intensive care unit of a tertiary referral hospital in Rwanda. Data included demographics, diagnosis, management, and outcomes. Logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with mortality. Results: Over a 7-month period, there were 126 surgical patients admitted to the intensive care unit. Common diagnoses included head injury (n = 55, 44%), peritonitis (n = 33, 26%), brain tumor (n = 15, 12%), and trauma (n = 15, 12%). The overall mortality was 47% with the highest mortality seen in patients with peritonitis (76%). Factors associated with mortality on intensive care unit admission included hypotension (odds ratio, 12.50; 95% confidence interval, 3.04, 51.32) and having any comorbidity (odds ratio 5.69, 95% confidence interval, 1.58, 20.50). Conclusion: Surgical patients admitted to the intensive care unit bear a significant mortality. Common surgical intensive care unit diagnoses include head injury and peritonitis. We recommend a review of the admission policy to optimize utility of the intensive care unit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)193-197
Number of pages5
JournalSurgery (United States)
Volume166
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2019

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Intensive Care Units
Cross-Sectional Studies
Mortality
Peritonitis
Craniocerebral Trauma
Odds Ratio
Rwanda
Confidence Intervals
Critical Care
Tertiary Care Centers
Critical Illness
Brain Neoplasms
Hypotension
Observational Studies
Comorbidity
Logistic Models
Demography
Wounds and Injuries
Pharmaceutical Preparations

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A cross sectional survey of factors influencing mortality in Rwandan surgical patients in the intensive care unit. / Bunogerane, Gisele Juru; Rickard, Jennifer L.

In: Surgery (United States), Vol. 166, No. 2, 01.08.2019, p. 193-197.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bunogerane, Gisele Juru ; Rickard, Jennifer L. / A cross sectional survey of factors influencing mortality in Rwandan surgical patients in the intensive care unit. In: Surgery (United States). 2019 ; Vol. 166, No. 2. pp. 193-197.
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