A cross-sectional analysis of variables impacting on AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among employees of a Minnesota teaching hospital

K. Henry, S. Campbell, K. Willenbring

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined variables that were correlated with the AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among employees of a 455-bed acute-care Minnesota teaching hospital and its associated clinics, located in a low-prevalence area for HIV infection. In August 1987, an anonymous questionnaire was sent via interdepartmental mail to all employees (2,980), including 270 physicians. The four-page survey obtained demographic information and measured 14 variables, including degree of homosexual bias, degree of homophobia, and AIDS-related knowledge, behaviors, attitudes, and anxiety level. Responses were obtained from 2,351 (79%) of the employees. By multivariate analysis, the following variables were highly correlated with positive behaviors and attitudes toward AIDS patients (p < .0001): lower homophobia scores, higher AIDS knowledge scores, expressed confidence in AIDS-related medical information, and a greater number of previous contacts with AIDS patients. Those with a family member or close friend with AIDS also showed more positive attitudes and behaviors (p < .02). Level of education was correlated with knowledge about AIDS (p < .0001) but was not correlated (p > .05) with more positive behaviors or attitudes inrelation to AIDS patients. Educational efforts should attempt to improve hospital employees' knowledge about AIDS and their confidence in AIDS-related medical information. Efforts to address homophobia should also be considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)36-47
Number of pages12
JournalAIDS Education and Prevention
Volume2
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 1 1990

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