A cost analysis of web-enhanced training to reduce alcohol sales to intoxicated bar patrons

Timothy F. Page, Dawn M. Nederhoff, Alexandra M. Ecklund, Keith J. Horvath, Toben F. Nelson, Darin J. Erickson, Traci L. Toomey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to document the development and testing costs of the Enhanced Alcohol Risk Management (eARM) intervention, a web enhanced training program to prevent alcohol sales to intoxicated bar patrons and to estimate its implementation costs in a "real world", non-research setting. Methods: Data for this study were obtained retrospectively from a randomized controlled trial of the eARM intervention, which was conducted across 15 communities in a Midwestern metropolitan area. Inputs and their costs were obtained from records maintained during the randomized controlled trial. Total development and testing costs were computed, and implementation costs were estimated with input from the research team. The average implementation cost per establishment was calculated by dividing the total estimated implementation cost by the number of establishments that participated in the study. This provides an estimate of the resources needed to support a broader dissemination of interventions such as eARM. Results: Direct development and testing costs were $484,904. Including the University's overhead cost rate of 51 percent, total development and testing costs were $732,205. Total estimated implementation costs were $179,999 over a 12 month period. The average cost per establishment was $1,588. Conclusions: Given the large damage liability awards faced by establishments that serve alcohol to drunk drivers, establishments or their insurance companies may be willing to pay the $1,588 estimated implementation cost in order to limit their exposure to these large damage awards. Therefore, making interventions such as eARM available could be an effective and sustainable policy for reducing alcohol-related incidents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-42
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Alcohol and Drug Education
Volume59
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

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sales
alcohol
Alcohols
Costs and Cost Analysis
costs
Risk Management
risk management
damages
overhead costs
Randomized Controlled Trials
insurance company
Insurance
liability
training program
agglomeration area
incident
driver
Education

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A cost analysis of web-enhanced training to reduce alcohol sales to intoxicated bar patrons. / Page, Timothy F.; Nederhoff, Dawn M.; Ecklund, Alexandra M.; Horvath, Keith J.; Nelson, Toben F.; Erickson, Darin J.; Toomey, Traci L.

In: Journal of Alcohol and Drug Education, Vol. 59, No. 2, 01.08.2015, p. 25-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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