A conservative, interface-resolved, compressible framework for the modeling and simulation of liquid/gas phase change

Everett A. Wenzel, Marco Arienti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper presents a method for simulating evaporation in a compressible, interface-resolved framework appropriate for modeling problems of engineering interest. In order to achieve robustness and broad applicability, the method has been designed to discretely enforce consistent mass and thermal energy transport at the phase interface, to globally conserve mass, momentum, and energy, and to be capable of modeling compressible and incompressible systems. Verification is performed via the Sod-shock test, one-dimensional heat conduction, evaporation from a planar interface, and evaporation of three-dimensional droplets. Convergence with increasing mesh resolution is demonstrated in all tested configurations, and conservation is maintained near machine precision for a translating droplet. Conservation and accurate phase change rates are preserved at the low numerical resolutions commonly encountered in engineering calculations. Following verification, the method is validated by comparison to an empirical correlation for evaporating droplets in high temperature crossflow, and the presentation concludes with the simulation of an iso-octane spray at conditions representative of gasoline direct injection. Successful verification, validation, and demonstrated practical utility suggest the method to be an accurate, efficient, and robust approach for the study of phase change in engineering systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number111957
JournalJournal of Computational Physics
Volume477
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2023
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 Elsevier Inc.

Keywords

  • Evaporation
  • Interfacial transport
  • Multiphase flow
  • Phase change

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