A comparison of symptoms between Swedish and American post-polio individuals and assessment of lower limb strength - A four-year cohort study

J. C. Agre, G. Grimby, A. A. Rodriguez, G. Einarsson, E. R. Swiggum, T. M. Franke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A cohort study with initial and 4-year follow-up evaluations was performed in 78 post-polio volunteers aged 34-65 years at the time of enrollment in the study, which was made to compare post-polio individuals living in Sweden and the United States, to determine whether lower limb musculature becomes weaker over time, and to determine whether individuals with complaints of post-polio syndrome, new weakness, fatigue, walking or stair climbing difficulty were weaker or lost more strength over a 4-year interval than those individuals without such complaints. Dynametrically-measured knee extensor and flexor strength and questionnaire data were obtained initially and 4 years later. The two cohorts were fairly similar, though they differed in weight gain. The Americans gained significantly (p < 0.05) more weight than the Swedish subjects. Both groups lost significant (p < 0.05) knee extensor strength (approximately 8%), but the loss was not significantly (p > 0.05) different between the groups. Knee flexor strength did not change significantly (p < 0.05) over time. Subjects acknowledging new strength loss were not significantly (p < 0.05) weaker than those denying strength loss; however, they lost significantly (p < 0.05) more isometric knee extensor strength than the other individuals. Subjects acknowledging new fatigue, walking or stair climbing difficulty were significantly (p < 0.05) weaker in both muscle groups than those without such complaints. Subjects acknowledging post-polio syndrome were significantly (p < 0.05) weaker than those denying this symptom, but the amount of loss of strength over time was not significantly (p > 0.05) different. We conclude that the two cohorts were quite similar. Knee extensor strength decreased during the study interval. Individuals acknowledging post-polio syndrome had weaker knee extensor musculature. Subjects with new fatigue, walking difficulty, or stair climbing difficulty were weaker in both the knee extensors and the knee flexors than the other subjects. Subjects reporting new muscle weakness also had a greater decline in isometric knee extensor strength during the study interval than those without such complaint.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-192
Number of pages10
JournalScandinavian Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine
Volume27
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

Fingerprint

Poliomyelitis
Lower Extremity
Knee
Cohort Studies
Postpoliomyelitis Syndrome
Fatigue
Mobility Limitation
Muscle Weakness
Sweden
Weight Gain
Walking
Volunteers

Keywords

  • muscle strength
  • neuromuscular disease
  • poliomyelitis
  • post-polio syndrome
  • symptoms

Cite this

A comparison of symptoms between Swedish and American post-polio individuals and assessment of lower limb strength - A four-year cohort study. / Agre, J. C.; Grimby, G.; Rodriguez, A. A.; Einarsson, G.; Swiggum, E. R.; Franke, T. M.

In: Scandinavian Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, Vol. 27, No. 3, 01.01.1995, p. 183-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "A cohort study with initial and 4-year follow-up evaluations was performed in 78 post-polio volunteers aged 34-65 years at the time of enrollment in the study, which was made to compare post-polio individuals living in Sweden and the United States, to determine whether lower limb musculature becomes weaker over time, and to determine whether individuals with complaints of post-polio syndrome, new weakness, fatigue, walking or stair climbing difficulty were weaker or lost more strength over a 4-year interval than those individuals without such complaints. Dynametrically-measured knee extensor and flexor strength and questionnaire data were obtained initially and 4 years later. The two cohorts were fairly similar, though they differed in weight gain. The Americans gained significantly (p < 0.05) more weight than the Swedish subjects. Both groups lost significant (p < 0.05) knee extensor strength (approximately 8{\%}), but the loss was not significantly (p > 0.05) different between the groups. Knee flexor strength did not change significantly (p < 0.05) over time. Subjects acknowledging new strength loss were not significantly (p < 0.05) weaker than those denying strength loss; however, they lost significantly (p < 0.05) more isometric knee extensor strength than the other individuals. Subjects acknowledging new fatigue, walking or stair climbing difficulty were significantly (p < 0.05) weaker in both muscle groups than those without such complaints. Subjects acknowledging post-polio syndrome were significantly (p < 0.05) weaker than those denying this symptom, but the amount of loss of strength over time was not significantly (p > 0.05) different. We conclude that the two cohorts were quite similar. Knee extensor strength decreased during the study interval. Individuals acknowledging post-polio syndrome had weaker knee extensor musculature. Subjects with new fatigue, walking difficulty, or stair climbing difficulty were weaker in both the knee extensors and the knee flexors than the other subjects. Subjects reporting new muscle weakness also had a greater decline in isometric knee extensor strength during the study interval than those without such complaint.",
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