A comparison of risk factors for metastasis at diagnosis in humans and dogs with osteosarcoma

Brandon J. Diessner, Tracy A. Marko, Ruth M. Scott, Andrea L. Eckert, Kathleen M. Stuebner, Ann E. Hohenhaus, Kim A. Selting, David A Largaespada, Jaime Modiano, Logan G Spector

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Canine osteosarcoma (OS) is a relevant spontaneous model for human OS. Identifying similarities in clinical characteristics associated with metastasis at diagnosis in both species may substantiate research aimed at using canine OS as a model for identifying mechanisms driving distant spread in the human disease. Methods: This retrospective study included dog OS cases from three academic veterinary hospitals and human OS cases from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program. Associations between clinical factors and metastasis at diagnosis were estimated using logistic regression models. Results: In humans, those with trunk tumors had higher odds of metastasis at diagnosis compared to those with lower limb tumors (OR = 2.38, 95% CI: 1.51, 3.69). A similar observation was seen in dogs with trunk tumors compared to dogs with forelimb tumors (OR = 3.28, 95% CI 1.36, 7.50). Other associations were observed in humans but not in dogs. Humans aged 20-29 years had lower odds of metastasis at diagnosis compared to those aged 10-14 years (OR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.47, 0.96); every 1-cm increase in tumor size was associated with a 6% increase in the odds of metastasis at diagnosis (95% CI: 1.04, 1.08); compared to those with a white, non-Hispanic race, higher odds were observed among those with a black, non-Hispanic race (OR: 1.51, 95% CI: 1.04, 2.16), and those with a Hispanic origin (OR 1.35, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.81). Conclusion: A common mechanism may be driving trunk tumors to progress to detectable metastasis prior to diagnosis in both species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3216-3226
Number of pages11
JournalCancer medicine
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2019

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Osteosarcoma
Dogs
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasms
Canidae
Logistic Models
SEER Program
Animal Hospitals
Forelimb
Hispanic Americans
Lower Extremity
Retrospective Studies
Research

Keywords

  • dog
  • human
  • metastasis
  • osteosarcoma

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

Diessner, B. J., Marko, T. A., Scott, R. M., Eckert, A. L., Stuebner, K. M., Hohenhaus, A. E., ... Spector, L. G. (2019). A comparison of risk factors for metastasis at diagnosis in humans and dogs with osteosarcoma. Cancer medicine, 8(6), 3216-3226. https://doi.org/10.1002/cam4.2177

A comparison of risk factors for metastasis at diagnosis in humans and dogs with osteosarcoma. / Diessner, Brandon J.; Marko, Tracy A.; Scott, Ruth M.; Eckert, Andrea L.; Stuebner, Kathleen M.; Hohenhaus, Ann E.; Selting, Kim A.; Largaespada, David A; Modiano, Jaime; Spector, Logan G.

In: Cancer medicine, Vol. 8, No. 6, 01.06.2019, p. 3216-3226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Diessner, BJ, Marko, TA, Scott, RM, Eckert, AL, Stuebner, KM, Hohenhaus, AE, Selting, KA, Largaespada, DA, Modiano, J & Spector, LG 2019, 'A comparison of risk factors for metastasis at diagnosis in humans and dogs with osteosarcoma', Cancer medicine, vol. 8, no. 6, pp. 3216-3226. https://doi.org/10.1002/cam4.2177
Diessner BJ, Marko TA, Scott RM, Eckert AL, Stuebner KM, Hohenhaus AE et al. A comparison of risk factors for metastasis at diagnosis in humans and dogs with osteosarcoma. Cancer medicine. 2019 Jun 1;8(6):3216-3226. https://doi.org/10.1002/cam4.2177
Diessner, Brandon J. ; Marko, Tracy A. ; Scott, Ruth M. ; Eckert, Andrea L. ; Stuebner, Kathleen M. ; Hohenhaus, Ann E. ; Selting, Kim A. ; Largaespada, David A ; Modiano, Jaime ; Spector, Logan G. / A comparison of risk factors for metastasis at diagnosis in humans and dogs with osteosarcoma. In: Cancer medicine. 2019 ; Vol. 8, No. 6. pp. 3216-3226.
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abstract = "Background: Canine osteosarcoma (OS) is a relevant spontaneous model for human OS. Identifying similarities in clinical characteristics associated with metastasis at diagnosis in both species may substantiate research aimed at using canine OS as a model for identifying mechanisms driving distant spread in the human disease. Methods: This retrospective study included dog OS cases from three academic veterinary hospitals and human OS cases from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program. Associations between clinical factors and metastasis at diagnosis were estimated using logistic regression models. Results: In humans, those with trunk tumors had higher odds of metastasis at diagnosis compared to those with lower limb tumors (OR = 2.38, 95{\%} CI: 1.51, 3.69). A similar observation was seen in dogs with trunk tumors compared to dogs with forelimb tumors (OR = 3.28, 95{\%} CI 1.36, 7.50). Other associations were observed in humans but not in dogs. Humans aged 20-29 years had lower odds of metastasis at diagnosis compared to those aged 10-14 years (OR = 0.67, 95{\%} CI: 0.47, 0.96); every 1-cm increase in tumor size was associated with a 6{\%} increase in the odds of metastasis at diagnosis (95{\%} CI: 1.04, 1.08); compared to those with a white, non-Hispanic race, higher odds were observed among those with a black, non-Hispanic race (OR: 1.51, 95{\%} CI: 1.04, 2.16), and those with a Hispanic origin (OR 1.35, 95{\%} CI: 1.00, 1.81). Conclusion: A common mechanism may be driving trunk tumors to progress to detectable metastasis prior to diagnosis in both species.",
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AU - Diessner, Brandon J.

AU - Marko, Tracy A.

AU - Scott, Ruth M.

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AU - Stuebner, Kathleen M.

AU - Hohenhaus, Ann E.

AU - Selting, Kim A.

AU - Largaespada, David A

AU - Modiano, Jaime

AU - Spector, Logan G

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N2 - Background: Canine osteosarcoma (OS) is a relevant spontaneous model for human OS. Identifying similarities in clinical characteristics associated with metastasis at diagnosis in both species may substantiate research aimed at using canine OS as a model for identifying mechanisms driving distant spread in the human disease. Methods: This retrospective study included dog OS cases from three academic veterinary hospitals and human OS cases from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program. Associations between clinical factors and metastasis at diagnosis were estimated using logistic regression models. Results: In humans, those with trunk tumors had higher odds of metastasis at diagnosis compared to those with lower limb tumors (OR = 2.38, 95% CI: 1.51, 3.69). A similar observation was seen in dogs with trunk tumors compared to dogs with forelimb tumors (OR = 3.28, 95% CI 1.36, 7.50). Other associations were observed in humans but not in dogs. Humans aged 20-29 years had lower odds of metastasis at diagnosis compared to those aged 10-14 years (OR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.47, 0.96); every 1-cm increase in tumor size was associated with a 6% increase in the odds of metastasis at diagnosis (95% CI: 1.04, 1.08); compared to those with a white, non-Hispanic race, higher odds were observed among those with a black, non-Hispanic race (OR: 1.51, 95% CI: 1.04, 2.16), and those with a Hispanic origin (OR 1.35, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.81). Conclusion: A common mechanism may be driving trunk tumors to progress to detectable metastasis prior to diagnosis in both species.

AB - Background: Canine osteosarcoma (OS) is a relevant spontaneous model for human OS. Identifying similarities in clinical characteristics associated with metastasis at diagnosis in both species may substantiate research aimed at using canine OS as a model for identifying mechanisms driving distant spread in the human disease. Methods: This retrospective study included dog OS cases from three academic veterinary hospitals and human OS cases from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program. Associations between clinical factors and metastasis at diagnosis were estimated using logistic regression models. Results: In humans, those with trunk tumors had higher odds of metastasis at diagnosis compared to those with lower limb tumors (OR = 2.38, 95% CI: 1.51, 3.69). A similar observation was seen in dogs with trunk tumors compared to dogs with forelimb tumors (OR = 3.28, 95% CI 1.36, 7.50). Other associations were observed in humans but not in dogs. Humans aged 20-29 years had lower odds of metastasis at diagnosis compared to those aged 10-14 years (OR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.47, 0.96); every 1-cm increase in tumor size was associated with a 6% increase in the odds of metastasis at diagnosis (95% CI: 1.04, 1.08); compared to those with a white, non-Hispanic race, higher odds were observed among those with a black, non-Hispanic race (OR: 1.51, 95% CI: 1.04, 2.16), and those with a Hispanic origin (OR 1.35, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.81). Conclusion: A common mechanism may be driving trunk tumors to progress to detectable metastasis prior to diagnosis in both species.

KW - dog

KW - human

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