A comparison of adipose tissue interstitial glucose and venous blood glucose during postprandial resistance exercise in patients with type 2 diabetes

Timothy D. Heden, Ying Liu, Jill A. Kanaley

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3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Resistance exercise during the postprandial period lowers venous glucose concentrations in individuals with type 2 diabetes, but the impact of resistance exercise on interstitial glucose concentrations is not well understood. The objective of this study was to compare subcutaneous adipose tissue interstitial glucose and venous blood glucose concentrations during postprandial resistance exercise in patients with type 2 diabetes. Eleven individuals completed two trials in a random order including a no-exercise (NoEx) and a postprandial resistance exercise trial (MEx). During the trials, the individuals consumed a meal and either remained sedentary (NoEx) or performed a session of resistance training beginning 45 min after the meal (M-Ex) while interstitial and venous glucose concentrations were simultaneously measured. Venous glucose during exercise was 11% lower (P = 0.05) during M-Ex (8.0 ± 0.5 mmol/l) compared with NoEx (9.0 ± 0.5 mmol/l) whereas interstitial glucose during M-Ex (10.4 ± 0.7 mmol/l) was not different compared with interstitial glucose during NoEx (10.1 ± 0.7 mmol/l). Bland-Altman plots revealed that the difference (bias) between interstitial and venous glucose during exercise was more than twofold greater during M-Ex (2.36 ± 2.07 mmol/l) compared with NoEx (1.11 ± 1.69 mmol/l). The mean (33.8 ± 6.2 mmol/l) and median (34.7 ± 6.3 mmol/l) absolute relative difference during exercise were 73% and 78% greater compared with the mean (19.5 ± 4.1 mmol/l) and median (19.5 ± 4.1 mmol/l) absolute relative difference during NoEx (P = 0.04). Resistance exercise has unequal effects on glucose concentrations within different bodily compartments as exercise reduced venous glucose concentrations but not adipose tissue interstitial glucose concentrations in the abdominal region in individuals with type 2 diabetes. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This is the first study to compare subcutaneous adipose tissue interstitial glucose concentrations and venous blood glucose concentrations during postprandial resistance exercise in individuals with type 2 diabetes. We find that resistance exercise effectively reduces systemic venous blood glucose concentrations but not subcutaneous adipose tissue interstitial glucose concentrations in the abdominal region. Resistance exercise has differential effects on glucose concentrations depending on its compartmentalization within the body.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1054-1061
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of applied physiology
Volume124
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding for this project was provided by funds from the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, University of Missouri (J. A. Kanaley). While this project was performed stipend support for T. D. Heden was provided by National Institutes of Health (NIH) Grant AR-048523. During the data analysis, writing, and submission of this manuscript, T. D. Heden was supported by NIH Grants DK-109556 and DK-110338 and J. A. Kanaley was supported by NIH Grant DK-101513.

Keywords

  • Blood glucose
  • Diabetes
  • Interstitial glucose
  • Obesity
  • Weight training

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