A comparison between finite volume and switched moving boundary approaches for dynamic vapor compression system modeling

Herschel Pangborn, Andrew G. Alleyne, Ning Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

43 Scopus citations

Abstract

Abstract Most work in dynamic heat exchanger modeling for control design can be classified as either a finite volume or a moving boundary formulation. These approaches represent fundamentally different discretization approaches and are often characterized as contrasting accuracy with simulation speed. This work challenges that characterization by validating finite volume and moving boundary heat exchanger models with experimental data from a vapor compression system in order to demonstrate that these approaches are capable of achieving similar levels of accuracy. However, there are differences. The moving boundary model is found to have faster simulation speed, while the finite volume model is more flexible for adaptation to heat exchangers of different physical configuration. The formulation of each modeling approach used in this work is described in detail and techniques to increase simulation speed and avoid numerical issues in implementation are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number2963
Pages (from-to)101-114
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Refrigeration
Volume53
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2015
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This material is based upon work supported by the United States Air Force under contract number FA8650-12-C-2231. It also supported by a University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign graduate fellowship. The authors would also like to acknowledge the technical assistance of Kevin McCarthy of P.C. Krause and Associates.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 Elsevier Ltd and IIR. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Finite volume
  • Heat exchanger model
  • Moving boundary
  • Vapor compression system

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