A CBPR partnership increases hiv testing among men who have sex with men (MSM): Outcome findings from a pilot test of the CyBER/testing internet intervention

Scott D. Rhodes, Aaron T. Vissman, Jason Stowers, Cindy Miller, Thomas P. McCoy, Kenneth C. Hergenrather, Aimee M. Wilkin, Michael Reece, Laura H. Bachmann, Addison Ore, Michael W. Ross, Ellen Hendrix, Eugenia Eng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

73 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Internet has emerged as an important tool for the delivery of health promotion and disease prevention interventions. Our community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnership developed and piloted CyBER/testing, a culturally congruent intervention designed to promote HIV testing among men who have sex with men (MSM) within existing Internet chat rooms. Using a quasi-experimental, single-group study design, cross-sectional data were collected from chat room participants, known as "chatters," at pretest (n = 346) and posttest (n = 315). Extant profile data also were collected to describe the demographics of the online population. The intervention significantly increased self-reported HIV testing among chatters overall, increasing rates from 44.5% at pretest to nearly 60% at posttest (p < .001). Furthermore, chatters who reported having both male and female sexual partners had nearly 6 times the odds of reporting HIV testing at posttest. Findings suggest that chat room-based HIV testing intervention may increase testing among MSM who may be difficult to reach in traditional physical spaces.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)311-320
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Education and Behavior
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011

Keywords

  • CBPR
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Internet
  • MSM
  • chat room
  • community-based participatory research
  • gay
  • intervention
  • men who have sex with men
  • video

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A CBPR partnership increases hiv testing among men who have sex with men (MSM): Outcome findings from a pilot test of the CyBER/testing internet intervention'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this