A behavioural economics approach to improving healthy food selection among food pantry clients

Caitlin E Caspi, Marna Canterbury, Samantha Carlson, Jamie Bain, Laura Bohen, Katherine Grannon, Hikaru H Peterson, Thomas Kottke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

ObjectiveTo test the effect of a behavioural economics intervention in two food pantries on the nutritional quality of foods available at the pantries and the foods selected by adults visiting food pantries.DesignAn intervention (SuperShelf) was implemented in two food pantries (Sites A and B), with two other pantries (Sites C and D) serving as a control for pantry outcomes. The intervention aimed to increase the amount and variety of healthy foods (supply), as well as the appeal of healthy foods (demand) using behavioural economics strategies. Assessments included baseline and 4-month follow-up client surveys, client cart inventories, pantry inventories and environmental assessments. A fidelity score (range 0-100) was assigned to each intervention pantry to measure the degree of implementation. A Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010) score (range 0-100) was generated for each client cart and pantry.SettingFour Minnesota food pantries, USA.ParticipantsClients visiting intervention pantries before (n 71) and after (n 70) the intervention.ResultsFidelity scores differed by intervention site (Site A=82, Site B=51). At Site A, in adjusted models, client cart HEI-2010 scores increased on average by 11·8 points (P<0·0001), whereas there was no change at Site B. HEI-2010 pantry environment scores increased in intervention pantries (Site A=8 points, Site B=19 points) and decreased slightly in control pantries (Site C=â'4 points, Site D=â'3 points).ConclusionsWhen implemented as intended, SuperShelf has the potential to improve the nutritional quality of foods available to and selected by pantry clients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPublic health nutrition
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Behavioral Economics
Food Preferences
Food
Nutritive Value
Equipment and Supplies
Food Supply

Keywords

  • Behavioural economics
  • Food insecurity
  • Food pantries
  • Healthy Eating Index-2010
  • Intervention

Cite this

A behavioural economics approach to improving healthy food selection among food pantry clients. / Caspi, Caitlin E; Canterbury, Marna; Carlson, Samantha; Bain, Jamie; Bohen, Laura; Grannon, Katherine; Peterson, Hikaru H; Kottke, Thomas.

In: Public health nutrition, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Caspi, Caitlin E ; Canterbury, Marna ; Carlson, Samantha ; Bain, Jamie ; Bohen, Laura ; Grannon, Katherine ; Peterson, Hikaru H ; Kottke, Thomas. / A behavioural economics approach to improving healthy food selection among food pantry clients. In: Public health nutrition. 2019.
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abstract = "ObjectiveTo test the effect of a behavioural economics intervention in two food pantries on the nutritional quality of foods available at the pantries and the foods selected by adults visiting food pantries.DesignAn intervention (SuperShelf) was implemented in two food pantries (Sites A and B), with two other pantries (Sites C and D) serving as a control for pantry outcomes. The intervention aimed to increase the amount and variety of healthy foods (supply), as well as the appeal of healthy foods (demand) using behavioural economics strategies. Assessments included baseline and 4-month follow-up client surveys, client cart inventories, pantry inventories and environmental assessments. A fidelity score (range 0-100) was assigned to each intervention pantry to measure the degree of implementation. A Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010) score (range 0-100) was generated for each client cart and pantry.SettingFour Minnesota food pantries, USA.ParticipantsClients visiting intervention pantries before (n 71) and after (n 70) the intervention.ResultsFidelity scores differed by intervention site (Site A=82, Site B=51). At Site A, in adjusted models, client cart HEI-2010 scores increased on average by 11·8 points (P<0·0001), whereas there was no change at Site B. HEI-2010 pantry environment scores increased in intervention pantries (Site A=8 points, Site B=19 points) and decreased slightly in control pantries (Site C={\^a}'4 points, Site D={\^a}'3 points).ConclusionsWhen implemented as intended, SuperShelf has the potential to improve the nutritional quality of foods available to and selected by pantry clients.",
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AB - ObjectiveTo test the effect of a behavioural economics intervention in two food pantries on the nutritional quality of foods available at the pantries and the foods selected by adults visiting food pantries.DesignAn intervention (SuperShelf) was implemented in two food pantries (Sites A and B), with two other pantries (Sites C and D) serving as a control for pantry outcomes. The intervention aimed to increase the amount and variety of healthy foods (supply), as well as the appeal of healthy foods (demand) using behavioural economics strategies. Assessments included baseline and 4-month follow-up client surveys, client cart inventories, pantry inventories and environmental assessments. A fidelity score (range 0-100) was assigned to each intervention pantry to measure the degree of implementation. A Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010) score (range 0-100) was generated for each client cart and pantry.SettingFour Minnesota food pantries, USA.ParticipantsClients visiting intervention pantries before (n 71) and after (n 70) the intervention.ResultsFidelity scores differed by intervention site (Site A=82, Site B=51). At Site A, in adjusted models, client cart HEI-2010 scores increased on average by 11·8 points (P<0·0001), whereas there was no change at Site B. HEI-2010 pantry environment scores increased in intervention pantries (Site A=8 points, Site B=19 points) and decreased slightly in control pantries (Site C=â'4 points, Site D=â'3 points).ConclusionsWhen implemented as intended, SuperShelf has the potential to improve the nutritional quality of foods available to and selected by pantry clients.

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