A 28-year follow-up of adults with a history of moderate phonological disorder: Linguistic and personality results

S. Felsenfeld, P. A. Broen, M. McGue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

80 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present investigation is a follow-up to a longitudinal speech and academic study involving approximately 400 normally developing children begun in 1960 by Mildred Templin. From this large data base, the present project invited the participation of two groups of subjects (now aged 32 to 34): (a) 24 adults with a documented history of moderately severe phonological disorder that persisted at least through the end of first grade (probands) and (b) 28 adults from the same birth cohort and schools who were known to have had at least average articulation skills over the same period (controls). Results of follow-up testing revealed that the proband adults performed significantly more poorly than the control adults on all of the administered measures of articulation, expressive language, and receptive language. Results obtained from a screening of nonverbal reasoning ability were equivocal. On a questionnaire measure of personality, both groups scored well within the normal range for the dimensions of extroversion and neuroticism when compared to the test's normative sample. These results have been interpreted as suggesting that although many adults with a childhood history of delayed phonological development will continue to experience linguistic outcomes that are less favorable than those of controls, their performance in selected nonlanguage domains (e.g., nonverbal reasoning, personality) will be far more typical of the general population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1114-1125
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Speech and Hearing Research
Volume35
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1992

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A 28-year follow-up of adults with a history of moderate phonological disorder: Linguistic and personality results'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this