A 16-month community-based intervention to increase aspirin use for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease

Niki C. Oldenburg, Sue Duval, Russell V. Luepker, John R. Finnegan, Heather LaMarre, Kevin A. Peterson, Nicole D. Zantek, Ginny Jacobs, Robert J. Straka, Karen H. Miller, Alan T. Hirsch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of disability and death in the United States. Primary prevention of these events may be achieved through aspirin use. The ability of a community-based intervention to increase aspirin use has not been evaluated. The objective of this study was to evaluate an educational intervention implemented to increase aspirin use for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in a small city in Minnesota. Methods: A community-based intervention was implemented during 16 months in a medium-sized community in Minnesota. Messages for aspirin use were disseminated to individuals, health care professionals, and the general population. Independent cross-sectional samples of residents (men aged 45-79, women aged 55-79) were surveyed by telephone to identify candidates for primary prevention aspirin use, examine their characteristics, and determine regular aspirin use at baseline and after the campaign at 4 months and 16 months. Results: In primary prevention candidates, regular aspirin use rates increased from 36% at baseline to 54% at 4 months (odds ratio = 2.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-3.88); the increase was sustained at 52% at 16 months (odds ratio = 1.89; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-3.49). The difference in aspirin use rates at 4 months and 16 months was not significant (P = .77). Conclusion: Aspirin use rates for primary prevention remain low. A combined public health and primary care approach can increase and sustain primary prevention aspirin use in a community setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number130378
JournalPreventing Chronic Disease
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2014

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