3D bioprinting for lungs and hollow organs

Zachary Galliger, Caleb D. Vogt, Angela Panoskaltsis-Mortari

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Three-dimensional bioprinting has been gaining attention as a potential method for creating biological tissues, supplementing the current arsenal of tissue engineering techniques. 3D bioprinting raises the possibility of reproducibly creating complex macro- and microscale architectures using multiple different cell types. This is promising for creation of multilayered hollow organs, which has been challenging using more traditional tissue engineering techniques. In this review, the state of the field in bioprinting of epithelialized hollow and tubular organs is discussed. Most of the progress for the pulmonary system has been restricted to the trachea. Due to the gross structural similarities and common engineering challenges when creating any epithelialized hollow organ, this review also covers current progress in printing within the gastrointestinal and genitourinary systems, as well as applications of traditional plastic printing in engineering these tissues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-34
Number of pages16
JournalTranslational Research
Volume211
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors would like to acknowledge Del Reed from the University of Minnesota Bio-Medical Library for assistance with the literature search. This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health NHLBI F31 ( 5F31HL142313 ) awarded to Z. P. Galliger, a CTSI Translational Research Development Program grant awarded to Z. P. Galliger (from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (grant UL1TR002494. PI: B. Blazar. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health’s National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences.), and the T32 ( 5T32HL007741 ) training grant for C. D. Vogt (Training in Pulmonary Science, PI: D. Ingbar). All authors have read the authorship agreement and have reviewed and approved this manuscript.

Funding Information:
The authors would like to acknowledge Del Reed from the University of Minnesota Bio-Medical Library for assistance with the literature search. This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health NHLBI F31 (5F31HL142313) awarded to Z. P. Galliger, a CTSI Translational Research Development Program grant awarded to Z. P. Galliger (from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (grant UL1TR002494. PI: B. Blazar. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences.), and the T32 (5T32HL007741) training grant for C. D. Vogt (Training in Pulmonary Science, PI: D. Ingbar). All authors have read the authorship agreement and have reviewed and approved this manuscript. Conflict of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest for this work, having read the journal's policy on conflicts of interest.

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