3D bioprinting for lungs and hollow organs

Zachary Galliger, Caleb D. Vogt, Angela Panoskaltsis-Mortari

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Three-dimensional bioprinting has been gaining attention as a potential method for creating biological tissues, supplementing the current arsenal of tissue engineering techniques. 3D bioprinting raises the possibility of reproducibly creating complex macro- and microscale architectures using multiple different cell types. This is promising for creation of multilayered hollow organs, which has been challenging using more traditional tissue engineering techniques. In this review, the state of the field in bioprinting of epithelialized hollow and tubular organs is discussed. Most of the progress for the pulmonary system has been restricted to the trachea. Due to the gross structural similarities and common engineering challenges when creating any epithelialized hollow organ, this review also covers current progress in printing within the gastrointestinal and genitourinary systems, as well as applications of traditional plastic printing in engineering these tissues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-34
Number of pages16
JournalTranslational Research
Volume211
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2019

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Bioprinting
Tissue Engineering
Tissue engineering
Printing
Lung
Arsenals
Urogenital System
Trachea
Plastics
Macros
Tissue

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Review

Cite this

3D bioprinting for lungs and hollow organs. / Galliger, Zachary; Vogt, Caleb D.; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela.

In: Translational Research, Vol. 211, 01.09.2019, p. 19-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Galliger, Zachary ; Vogt, Caleb D. ; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela. / 3D bioprinting for lungs and hollow organs. In: Translational Research. 2019 ; Vol. 211. pp. 19-34.
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