3D bioprinting directly onto moving human anatomy

John J. O'Neill, Reed A. Johnson, Rodney L. Dockter, Timothy M. Kowalewski

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper establishes the feasibility of robotically 3D printing biomaterials such as alginate hydrogels onto moving human anatomy and a stationary plane. The alginate hydrogels used are in-vivo compatible and a proven biomaterial for tissue scaffolds. We developed a control scheme for precision material deposition via piezo microjetting while tracking in real-time to continuously sense anatomy location and deposits material in a predefined trajectory derived from two pre-selected target geometries. We show that multilayer 3D structures can be created on a moving human hand with 1.6 mm average error and 87.8 % overall accuracy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationIROS 2017 - IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages934-940
Number of pages7
ISBN (Electronic)9781538626825
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 13 2017
Event2017 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, IROS 2017 - Vancouver, Canada
Duration: Sep 24 2017Sep 28 2017

Publication series

NameIEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems
Volume2017-September
ISSN (Print)2153-0858
ISSN (Electronic)2153-0866

Other

Other2017 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, IROS 2017
Country/TerritoryCanada
CityVancouver
Period9/24/179/28/17

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We would like to thank the MnDRIVE Robotics, Sensors, and Advanced Manufacturing initiative for financial support. Research was sponsored in part by the Army Research Laboratory and was accomplished under Cooperative Agree- ment Number W911NF-14-2-0035. The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the Army Research Laboratory or the U.S. Government. The U.S. Government is authorized to reproduce and distribute reprints for Government purposes notwithstanding any copyright notation herein.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 IEEE.

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