24-Month outcomes of primary care web-based depression prevention intervention in adolescents: Randomized clinical trial

Benjamin van Voorhees, Tracy R.G. Gladstone, Kunmi Sobowale, C. Hendricks Brown, David A. Aaby, Daniela A. Terrizzi, Jason Canel, Eumene Ching, Anita D. Berry, James Cantorna, Milton Eder, William Beardslee, Marian Fitzgibbon, Monika Marko-Holguin, Linda Schiffer, Miae Lee, Sarah A. de Forest, Emily E. Sykes, Jennifer H. Suor, Theodore J. CrawfordKatie L. Burkhouse, Brady C. Goodwin, Carl Bell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Adolescent depression carries a high burden of disease worldwide, but access to care for this population is limited. Prevention is one solution to curtail the negative consequences of adolescent depression. Internet interventions to prevent adolescent depression can overcome barriers to access, but few studies examine long-term outcomes.

OBJECTIVE: This study compares CATCH-IT (Competent Adulthood Transition with Cognitive Behavioral Humanistic and Interpersonal Training), an internet-based intervention, to a general health education active control for depression onset at 12 and 24 months in adolescents presenting to primary care settings.

METHODS: A 2-site randomized trial, blinded to the principal investigators and assessors, was conducted comparing Competent Adulthood Transition with Cognitive Behavioral Humanistic and Interpersonal Training to health education to prevent depressive episodes in 369 adolescents (193 youths were randomly assigned to Competent Adulthood Transition with Cognitive Behavioral Humanistic and Interpersonal Training and 176 to health education) with subthreshold depressive symptoms or prior depressive episodes. Participants were recruited from primary care settings in the United States. The primary outcome was the occurrence of a depressive episode, determined by the Depression Symptom Rating. The secondary outcome was functioning, measured by the Global Assessment Scale.

RESULTS: In intention-to-treat analyses, the adjusted hazard ratio favoring Competent Adulthood Transition with Cognitive Behavioral Humanistic and Interpersonal Training for first depressive episode was not statistically significant at 12 months (hazard ratio 0.77, 95% CI 0.42-1.40, P=.39) and 24 months (hazard ratio 0.87, 95% CI 0.52-1.47, P=.61). Competent Adulthood Transition with Cognitive Behavioral Humanistic and Interpersonal Training provided preventive benefit for first depressive episode for those with mild hopelessness or at least moderate paternal monitoring at baseline. Global Assessment Scale scores improved comparably in both groups (intention-to-treat).

CONCLUSIONS: A technology-based intervention for adolescent depression prevention implemented in primary care did not have additional benefit at 12 or 24 months. Further research is necessary to determine whether internet interventions have long-term benefit.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01893749; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01893749.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere16802
JournalJournal of medical Internet research
Volume22
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 28 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Research reported in this article was supported by the National Institute of Mental Health of the National Institutes of Health under award number R01MH090035. The implementation process was developed with funding from Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The funders had no involvement in study design, data collection and analysis, and preparation and submission of the manuscript. The interest of Asok K Ray, MD FRCS (Edin), Purnima Ray, and Malika Ray in this manuscript and research is appreciated.

Publisher Copyright:
©Benjamin Van Voorhees, Tracy R G Gladstone, Kunmi Sobowale, C Hendricks Brown, David A Aaby, Daniela A Terrizzi, Jason Canel, Eumene Ching, Anita D Berry, James Cantorna, Milton Eder, William Beardslee, Marian Fitzgibbon, Monika Marko-Holguin, Linda Schiffer, Miae Lee, Sarah A de Forest, Emily E Sykes, Jennifer H Suor, Theodore J Crawford, Katie L Burkhouse, Brady C Goodwin, Carl Bell.

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Depression
  • EHealth
  • Prevention
  • Scalable

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Randomized Controlled Trial
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

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